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Children, Food, and Life: What is the loveliest thing a child has ever said to you? Richard Muller, Prof Physics, UC Berkeley, author "Now, The Physics of Time" Updated Aug 2, 2017 Originally Answered: What is the loveliest thing your child has ever said? "Would you like one, Grandpa?" OK- it was not my child but my 3-year-old granddaughter, but I still think it counts. I had read about the marshmallow test. You give a child a marshmallow, and then say that if she (Layla, in this case) could keep from eating it for 10 minutes, you'll give her a second. So I tried that test with my granddaughter (not with marshmallows, but with chocolate, which she likes much more) According to extensive experiments, children who "pass" the "marshmallow test" are far more successful in later life. They have learned a fundamental truth in life, that delayed gratification can lead to a far better long-term outcome. She sat and watched the chocolate. The 10-minute hourglass finally emptied, and she had succeeded. She asked for her second piece of chocolate. I gave it to her, and she now had two in her hand. That's when she looked up at me and asked, "Would you like one, Grandpa?" Needless to say, from that moment on I would readily give my life for her. 1.3m views View Upvoters View Sharers hippo-pot: awesomacious: The sweetest granddaughter btw the marshmallow test has been linked to class - kids from wealthier families are essentially more likely to trust that they will actually get the marshmallow if they wait whereas poorer kids are generally more used to like, if you have food, eat it. and being wealthier correlates to being more successful later in life because our system is broken. so THAT’s probably why the marshmallow test is a predictor - because it tells you who is wealthy, not who is innately primed to be successful Classic correlation does not equal causation
Children, Food, and Life: What is the loveliest thing a child has
 ever said to you?
 Richard Muller, Prof Physics, UC Berkeley,
 author "Now, The Physics of Time"
 Updated Aug 2, 2017
 Originally Answered: What is the loveliest thing your child has ever
 said?
 "Would you like one, Grandpa?"
 OK- it was not my child but my 3-year-old
 granddaughter, but I still think it counts.
 I had read about the marshmallow test. You give a child
 a marshmallow, and then say that if she (Layla, in this
 case) could keep from eating it for 10 minutes, you'll
 give her a second. So I tried that test with my
 granddaughter (not with marshmallows, but with
 chocolate, which she likes much more)
 According to extensive experiments, children who
 "pass" the "marshmallow test" are far more successful
 in later life. They have learned a fundamental truth in
 life, that delayed gratification can lead to a far better
 long-term outcome.
 She sat and watched the chocolate. The 10-minute
 hourglass finally emptied, and she had succeeded. She
 asked for her second piece of chocolate. I gave it to her,
 and she now had two in her hand. That's when she
 looked up at me and asked, "Would you like one,
 Grandpa?"
 Needless to say, from that moment on I would readily
 give my life for her.
 1.3m views View Upvoters View Sharers
hippo-pot:

awesomacious:
The sweetest granddaughter
btw the marshmallow test has been linked to class - kids from wealthier families are essentially more likely to trust that they will actually get the marshmallow if they wait whereas poorer kids are generally more used to like, if you have food, eat it. and being wealthier correlates to being more successful later in life because our system is broken. so THAT’s probably why the marshmallow test is a predictor - because it tells you who is wealthy, not who is innately primed to be successful

Classic correlation does not equal causation

hippo-pot: awesomacious: The sweetest granddaughter btw the marshmallow test has been linked to class - kids from wealthier families are es...

Advice, Children, and Click: Mr. Rogers used a set of 9 simple rules when talking to children. He did this to be more inclusive and avoid confusion because he knew children would often hear things literally. Ultrafacts.tumblr.com ultrafacts: 1. “State the idea you wish to express as clearly as possible, and in terms preschoolers can understand.” Example: It is dangerous to play in the street. ​​​​​ 2. “Rephrase in a positive manner,” as in It is good to play where it is safe. 3. “Rephrase the idea, bearing in mind that preschoolers cannot yet make subtle distinctions and need to be redirected to authorities they trust.” As in, “Ask your parents where it is safe to play.” 4. “Rephrase your idea to eliminate all elements that could be considered prescriptive, directive, or instructive.” In the example, that’d mean getting rid of “ask”: Your parents will tell you where it is safe to play. 5. “Rephrase any element that suggests certainty.” That’d be “will”: Your parents can tell you where it is safe to play. 6. “Rephrase your idea to eliminate any element that may not apply to all children.” Not all children know their parents, so: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. 7. “Add a simple motivational idea that gives preschoolers a reason to follow your advice.” Perhaps: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is good to listen to them. 8. “Rephrase your new statement, repeating the first step.” “Good” represents a value judgment, so: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is important to try to listen to them. 9. “Rephrase your idea a final time, relating it to some phase of development a preschooler can understand.” Maybe: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is important to try to listen to them, and listening is an important part of growing. Source: [x] Click HERE for more facts
Advice, Children, and Click: Mr. Rogers used a set of 9 simple rules
 when talking to children. He did this to be
 more inclusive and avoid confusion
 because he knew children would often
 hear things literally.
 Ultrafacts.tumblr.com
ultrafacts:
1. “State the idea you wish to express as clearly as possible, and in terms preschoolers can understand.” Example: It is dangerous to play in the street. ​​​​​
2. “Rephrase in a positive manner,” as in It is good to play where it is safe.
3. “Rephrase the idea, bearing in mind that preschoolers cannot yet make subtle distinctions and need to be redirected to authorities they trust.” As in, “Ask your parents where it is safe to play.”
4. “Rephrase your idea to eliminate all elements that could be considered prescriptive, directive, or instructive.” In the example, that’d mean getting rid of “ask”: Your parents will tell you where it is safe to play.
5. “Rephrase any element that suggests certainty.” That’d be “will”: Your parents can tell you where it is safe to play.
6. “Rephrase your idea to eliminate any element that may not apply to all children.” Not all children know their parents, so: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play.
7. “Add a simple motivational idea that gives preschoolers a reason to follow your advice.” Perhaps: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is good to listen to them.
8. “Rephrase your new statement, repeating the first step.” “Good” represents a value judgment, so: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is important to try to listen to them.
9. “Rephrase your idea a final time, relating it to some phase of development a preschooler can understand.” Maybe: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is important to try to listen to them, and listening is an important part of growing.
Source: [x]
Click HERE for more facts

ultrafacts: 1. “State the idea you wish to express as clearly as possible, and in terms preschoolers can understand.” Example: It is dangero...

Bitch, Children, and Clothes: RANT ian CUISINE FRANPAISE queeranarchism: yourdarlingdaisy916: idkmybffphil: looklikewolf: irate-badfem-harpy: aliaitee: mboy-mlm: the-claire-bitch-project: thepunksink: the-big-phan-theory: doyounoelyourenemy: sidvintage: motherfuckin-pajamas: deadkennedysandattractivemen: A punk stops during a gay pride parade to allow a mesmerized child to touch his jacket spikes. I lost control about reblogging this picture.  and this is the perfect “fuck you” to people who stereotype people like this.  literally one of my favourite pictures ever nothing more punk than letting small children touch your clothes spikes or hair spikes If you think punks would miss the opportunity to be a good fucking human to kids you don’t know much about punks Being nice to kids is literally the number one punk activity THIS IS THE SAME DUDE BITCH NO WAYYYY I have a vivid memory of being about 14 and seeing a hardcore punk walking down the street in a busy shopping district with a tiny white kitten tucked in his leather jacket. That’s goals. one of my favorite memories is my first punk show and how welcoming and friendly everyone was. I was 9 and my brother brought me and people were putting me on their shoulders and telling me about where they got their clothes or how much a little punk I was. I love punk culture because from the outside it looks aggressive and harsh. But once you realize that’s just their armour and that they are kinder and more proactive about human rights than the “nice” looking people you get comfort from their presence. Not all things that look aggressive are aggressive. Not all things that look safe are safe. Punk is safe BECAUSE it is aggressive. Punk - when done right - kicks out fascists and rapists, defends communities, fights injustice. All of which require aggression.
Bitch, Children, and Clothes: RANT
 ian
 CUISINE FRANPAISE
queeranarchism:

yourdarlingdaisy916:

idkmybffphil:


looklikewolf:

irate-badfem-harpy:


aliaitee:

mboy-mlm:

the-claire-bitch-project:

thepunksink:

the-big-phan-theory:

doyounoelyourenemy:

sidvintage:

motherfuckin-pajamas:

deadkennedysandattractivemen:

A punk stops during a gay pride parade to allow a mesmerized child to touch his jacket spikes.

I lost control about reblogging this picture. 

and this is the perfect “fuck you” to people who stereotype people like this. 

literally one of my favourite pictures ever

nothing more punk than letting small children touch your clothes spikes or hair spikes

If you think punks would miss the opportunity to be a good fucking human to kids you don’t know much about punks

Being nice to kids is literally the number one punk activity


THIS IS THE SAME DUDE

BITCH NO WAYYYY




I have a vivid memory of being about 14 and seeing a hardcore punk walking down the street in a busy shopping district with a tiny white kitten tucked in his leather jacket. That’s goals.

one of my favorite memories is my first punk show and how welcoming and friendly everyone was. I was 9 and my brother brought me and people were putting me on their shoulders and telling me about where they got their clothes or how much a little punk I was.


I love punk culture because from the outside it looks aggressive and harsh. But once you realize that’s just their armour and that they are kinder and more proactive about human rights than the “nice” looking people you get comfort from their presence.  
Not all things that look aggressive are aggressive. Not all things that look safe are safe. 

Punk is safe BECAUSE it is aggressive. Punk - when done right - kicks out fascists and rapists, defends communities, fights injustice. All of which require aggression.

queeranarchism: yourdarlingdaisy916: idkmybffphil: looklikewolf: irate-badfem-harpy: aliaitee: mboy-mlm: the-claire-bitch-project: ...